Jewson announces Building Better Communities shortlist

Published:  21 April, 2015

Jewson has been asking people up and down the country to nominate community projects that are in need of a transformation and, after over 2,000 entries, the shortlist has been revealed.

As part of its Building Better Communities initiative, Jewson offered community building projects the chance to win a share of £100,000 to be spent on anything from a new roof for their village hall, to a much needed coat of paint for a long-forgotten public space.

A team of 60 judges, including Jewson employees and supplier partners, deliberated over the course of a week and picked the final 63 projects which will progress to the next stage of the competition. The projects range from a mountain rescue team to food banks and community centre refurbishments.

David Fenton, marketing director at Jewson, said: “The Building Better Communities scheme has received an incredible response and we’ve seen more than 2,000 entries from people across the UK. It was really difficult to compile a shortlist from so many worthwhile projects.

“It’s clear that helping projects such as these will play a vital role in improving communities.”

After carrying out initial research into communities across the UK, Jewson found that 70% of residents felt there was average to little community spirit in the area where they live.

To view the full list of selected winners, visit:

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