Building materials donated by Travis Perkins help the London unemployed learn a skill.

TP lends a hand to Live Train

Published:  10 July, 2012

NORTHAMPTON/LONDON: National builder's merchant Travis Perkins is supporting the next generation of skills by donating £4500 worth of building materials to Live Train, a training scheme based in London for the unemployed.

TP donated bricks, copper pipework, sinks, taps, bathtubs, cabinets, plaster board and a host of other materials to create a realistic working scenario for the students. Each pupil is tasked with completing projects such as plumbing in water and waste feeds and boxing in pipework.

Dell Fitzgerald, regional director of TP for London, said: "Supporting skills and community causes is incredibly important to Travis Perkins and Live Train is a fantastic cause. Training schemes such as this help bridge the industry skills gap and with unemployment figures being at an all-time high, it is vital that people of all ages are given the chance to learn a trade."

Live Train is a free 14-week construction programme which runs three times a year. The course equips unemployed people with the skills and experience to start a sustainable career in the building and construction industry.  Recognised by City & Guilds qualifications, the training course is carried out on site as well as in a workshop, allowing participants to gain valuable experience of 'live' building sites.

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