Fuel campaign set for debate in House of Commons

Published:  16 November, 2011

LONDON: The Road Haulage Association, which is a member of FairFuelUK (FFUK), along with the Builders Merchants Federation, called for a freeze in fuel duty ahead of yesterday's crucial debate in the House of Commons.

Geoff Dunning, chief executive of the RHA, says that fuel is affecting the price of almost everything made and bought in the UK and further increases could derail the UK economy.

"We are now faced with the prospect of two substantial duty increases: a 3.02p per litre in January and then another increase in August that is likely to be around 3.41p per litre," says Dunning. "That would be an 11% increase over just eight months."

FFUK has managed to persuade over 110 000 people to join an e-petition to persuade the government to take action on fuel prices. The motion has won support from over 100 MPs, mainly Conservatives.

The BMF, which joined the FFUK campaign in January, urged all its members to personally sign the petition in order to demonstrate the depth of feeling against further increases in fuel duty.

The BMF supported the campaign on the understanding that it would not involve direct action or blockades.

It has also highlighted the stunting effects that ever-rising fuel costs have on merchants and the building sector generally.

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